Soybean Pest Podcast

by Matt O'Neal and Erin Hodgson

Erin HodgsonMatt O'Neal

Drs. Matt O’Neal and Erin Hodgson created a podcast to promote IPM concepts, like identification, sampling, economic thresholds, and insecticide efficacy. They also talk about updates on invasive pests and regulatory news, and translate new research relative to insects in agriculture.

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10/20/2017

Today, Matt and Erin take a major detour and talk about an art exhibit that features fantasy coffins. Matt visited with Eric Anang, an artist-in-residence at the University of Iowa. Erik's family is from Ghana and they have a tradition of building fantasy coffins designed to reflect unique personalities. He recently was interested in the decline of insects, particularly lightening bugs, in his native area and that sparked the idea for this exhibit. You can see the exhibit at the Blackbox Memorial Theater at U of I now and can hear Matt give a seminar on October 26. 

Eric Anang with honey bee coffin

honey bee coffin

 

10/13/2017

Today, Matt and Erin cover a wide range of topics. First, there are two entomologists interviewing for ISU president: Sonny Ramaswamy and Wendy Wintersteen. But the conversation is quickly diverted into talking about why entomologists make good leaders. Matt has another F.I.T. that includes a reference to Hogwarts. Tom Saunders named a new parasitoid wasp species after Lucius Malfoy, a character in the Harry Potter series. The new wasp was named Lusius malfoyi. Erin asks Matt about fall nuisance invaders around Ames, including multicolored Asian lady beetles, minute pirate bugs, and brown lacewings. Erin gives a shout-out to an insect-related podcast, Arthropod, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This interesting series goes in-depth on insects and closely related species (e.g., painted lady butterflies and brown recluse spiders). Lastly, they are spreading the word about a fundraiser for BugGuide - help them meet their goal of $15,000!

10/04/2017

The long-awaited teaser is resolved in today's episode. Erin reveals she did get Lyme disease this summer. She recaps the experience and outlook for the future. There are 232 confirmed or probable cases of Lyme disease in Iowa this year, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health. References to Lyric's tick paper can be found in the previous episode. Matt brings up another interesting F.I.T. (fun insect trivia) featuring two entomologists: Jeffrey Lockwood and C. V. Riley. Lockwood is a rangeland entomologist focused on grasshopper management, and an award-winning author and University of Wyoming professor of Natural Sciences and Humanities. He writes science and fiction books, including his latest crime novel called Poison Justice. Riley also studied grasshoppers but is most known as the Father of Classical Biocontrol. He was one of the first to practice biocontrol, introducing a beetle that was the natural enemy to a scale that was damaging the California citrus industry.

 

09/14/2017

Matt and Erin were supposed to be in Savannah, GA for a soybean symposium this week. But due to Hurricane Irma, the conference was canceled and they created a bonus episode of random topics. Soybean is quickly maturing throughout Iowa and insects are making preparations for the winter. Matt summarized a last-minute soybean research symposium recapping some of the presentations planned for the Georgia gathering. Both Matt and Erin noticed a lot of wasp activity around human structures and Matt explained they lose their social structure this time of year. Erin thinks she might have Lyme disease and will update listeners on her progress the next episode (teaser!). ISU faculty member, Ryan Smith, shared the blacklegged tick is expanding range in Iowa and the proportion of infected ticks is increasing in Iowa (see this survey summary for more details). Dr. Smith also said there are 195 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Iowa so far this year. Finally, Matt talks about another great F.I.T. of Ward Kimball, creator of Jiminy Cricket. 

Jiminy Cricket

09/08/2017

Matt and Erin talk briefly about resurging soybean aphid populations around northern Iowa. In some fields, aphid numbers have increased as fields reach full seed set. They also talk about 2 videos of potential interest to everyone. The first video shows off the extremely high numbers of mosquitoes in Texas due to Hurricane Harvey. The second video talks about the importance of Bt resistance management of insects. Finally, Matt shares a F.I.T. and art at Iowa State University. 

08/29/2017

Matt and Erin took a short podcasting break but are back to summarize late season soybean pest activity. Erin talks about a slight resurgence of soybean aphid populations in northern Iowa. Read more about treating at full seed set in a recent ICM Blog. Erin also recommends scouting in late August/early September for second-generation bean leaf beetles, as feeding injury to pods and seeds could be significant. Matt has noticed perhaps early field senescence in some commercial fields in Iowa. He also took a trip to Mississippi to see soybean production and learn more about pollinator protection. This podcast also features a F.I.T.!

07/24/2017

It seems like a long time since the last episode and that's because it was! Matt and Erin are back to talk about pest updates in Iowa. Drought stress throughout much of the state has been ideal for twospotted spider mite. Erin reports Some injury has been observed in corn and soybean this summer. Treatments are going on now throughout some southern Iowa counties. In addition, soybean aphid continues to be an erratic pest. Some populations are building up in northern Iowa counties, but most fields are not reaching the economic threshold in July. Matt elaborates about high numbers of Japanese beetle and they talk about the use of pheromone traps as a management tool. Finally, Matt talks about a new Science research paper that has inconsistent data on the effect of neonicotinoid seed treatments on wild and managed bees in Europe. 

06/28/2017

Today, Erin is without her podcasting bestie, Matt. She summarizes the activity of a few field crop pests in Iowa. First, she mentions Japanese beetle is active in soybean now and will move to corn with the emergence of silks. There are also European corn borer egg masses and small larvae in non-Bt corn now. You can access a free publication to learn more about scouting and management of ECB. Erin also gives an update on thistle caterpillar and soybean aphid from the last episode - both pests are still active right now. Finally, she highlights potato leafhopper as an occasional pest of soybean and alfalfa. You can register for some upcoming demonstration events at FEEL for July 12 (Diagnostic Clinic) and July 13 (Management Clinic) right here

06/20/2017

In this mid-June episode, Matt and Erin start off by summarizing current soybean aphid activity around the state of Iowa. Populations are showing up over much of northern Iowa the last two weeks. Some fields have approached infestations ranging from 10-50%, although the density per plant remains low. Under ideal conditions, these populations could exceed the economic threshold in a few weeks. Brian Lang also found an aphid mummy, which is also early compared to most summers. Erin talked about a new publication for European corn borer that is available at the ISU Extension Bookstore. The 12-page pub reviews identification, life cycle, plant damage, scouting and treatment recommendations for this devastating pest. In their new segment, Matt talks semantics about how to spell one of the most widely recognized insects in the world. 

06/14/2017

In this episode, Matt and Erin start off with talking about the hot weather in Ames. A local rain shower will help lawns and crops. Erin shared some updates on soybean aphid in Iowa. A few more reports are showing up from the lab as they visit various research farms. The percent infested plants is higher than in the past few years, so scouting in highly encouraged this summer. Both have noted aphids around the yard and on campus this month, too. Matt wants to try out a new segment called F.I.T. (fun insect trivia). He asked me about how the malaise trap was named and Erin was kinda right. Erin also had a F.I.T. about determining the sex of Japanese beetle. It wasn't nearly as interesting as Matt's story and maybe not even that important to know. Erin also noted Japanese beetles are emerging in southern Iowa and corn rootworm egg hatch is peaking around Iowa this week. If you live in north-central Iowa, plan to attend a field day at the ISU Northern Farm near Kanawha. 

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