Garden fleahopper: Injury and damage

Garden fleahopper damage: Injury to soybeans from garden fleahoppers, Halticus bractatus during early July [top and middle] and their apparent recovery in late August. (Photo Marlin E. Rice)Garden fleahopper damage: Injury to soybeans from garden fleahoppers, Halticus bractatus during early July [top and middle] and their apparent recovery in late August. (Photo Marlin E. Rice)

Garden fleahopper injury: Garden fleahoppers, Halticus bractatus, [inset] and leaf wilting injury in soybeans. (Photo Marlin E. Rice)Garden fleahopper injury: Garden fleahoppers, Halticus bractatus, [inset] and leaf wilting injury in soybeans. (Photo Marlin E. Rice)

Upon close inspection, injury to soybean leaves from the garden fleahopper reveals tiny spots resulting from their feeding activity. These insects have piercing-sucking mouthparts, which they use to puncture plant cells, that leave a scar on the leaf after feeding (as seen on the close-up image on the previous page). Adults and nymphs may feed on either the top or bottom side of a leaflet, and large populations can exert a large stress on soybean plants causing the leaves to wither and die. However, plants are not likely to be killed and may fully recover with adequate soil moisture.