Bean leaf beetles out but spider mites are still top dog

Soybean aphid populations remain low but first generation bean leaf beetles are out i some areas this week. Spider mites are still the primary problem, and we encourage scouting to protect yield.

Spider mites continue damage

Although soybean aphid has been a relatively low threat this year, drought conditions have been a perfect storm for spider mites. We encourage people to scout fields now to fully protect yield.

The drought thickens: dry hot weather is good for spider mites

Drought conditions continue for all of Iowa, setting the stage for spider mite outbreaks. Drs. O'Neal and Hodgson discuss the challenges of managing this pest. For more information visit http://iowabuglife.blogspot.com/ for pictures and additional details about spider mites. For more info about managing crops and pests in this drought visit
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/

July 13: Good news, bad news, and drought

Its Friday the 13th and farmers have much to worry about. But despite the record breaking temperatures and drought, there is some good news. We discuss the lack of soybean aphids throughout most of Iowa. However, there are other insect pests that growers should be scouting, including japanese beetles and spider mites. For more info about insects this summer, see Dr. Hodgson's blog (http://iowabuglife.blogspot.com).

Iowa continues to be hot and dry

Hot weather isn't favorable for soybean aphid, so numbers are still down. But spider mites and other pests thrive in these conditions.

Japanese beetles: not just in soybeans

As we wait for soybean aphids to arrive, we discuss how the early and large outbreak of Japanese beetles in central Iowa may harm crop production. Dr. Hodgson discusses some options for preventing the beetles from clipping corn silk, a significant form of damage caused by these pests. For more info, visit Dr. Hodgson's blog at http://iowabuglife.blogspot.com

Japanese beetles: a new pest of Iowa corn and soybeans?

June is often a quiet month for insect pests but not this year as the Japanese beetle has emerged 2 to 3 weeks earlier then usual. So even though soybean aphids are uncommon right now, farmers may want to scout for this pest. We discuss what to look for and what the impact could be. To meet with Dr. Hodgson, consider joining her at the Crop Management Clinic (11-12 July) at FEEL. Visit this site for more information http://www.aep.iastate.edu/feel/cmc.html

The Soybean Aphid Podcast is back for 2012!

Drs. Hodgson and O'Neal return with weekly updates on the insect pests attacking soybeans. This week we discuss the first reports of soybean aphids in Iowa, the growing risk for spider mite outbreaks, and an alarming change in the emergence of Japanese beetles.

New publication about where to find aphid resistant soybeans

Farmers interested in purchasing aphid resistant soybeans can learn more in a new publication from ISU.

Seed companies were surveyed in the fall of 2011 regarding the availability of aphid resistant varieties. Good news: aphid resistant soybean seed is available. Learn about what companies are selling these through this 4-page summary. Download it for free here.
http://www.ent.iastate.edu/soybeanaphid/files/SBAresistance2012corrected...

(NOTE-This document was edited on March 29, 2012. In the original an NK Brand seed was miss-labelled S21-EF. It was corrected to NK Brand S21-Q3.)

Bring it home: wrapping up a season of aphids in soybeans

As soybeans reach the late reproductive stages the need to manage aphids decreases. However, aphids persist in soybean fields around the midwest. We discuss a couple factors that should be considered when applying insecticides this late in the year. Also, we re-count the spread of Japanese beetles in Iowa as a new herbivore of soybeans.