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Department of Entomology

ISU Entomology / Moving Away from Animal Data in Regulatory Decisions: The Case of Dermal Absorption for Pesticide Risk Assessment

Moving Away from Animal Data in Regulatory Decisions: The Case of Dermal Absorption for Pesticide Risk Assessment

Sheryl Beauvais, Ph.D., Staff Toxicologist, California EPA, Sacramento, CA
Abstract: For most pesticides, the highest exposures occur during application and to field workers in treated crops, and dermal uptake is the major exposure route. Pesticide risk assessments generally rely on studies conducted in laboratory animals to estimate toxicity and the extent to which pesticides are dermally absorbed. For many years, regulatory agencies in Europe and North America have been under pressure to move away from reliance on animal data. Dermal absorption is used as a case study of the challenges encountered, as well as background information necessary for the transition.
Co-listed with the Toxicology Program